Political Propaganda, Aesthetics and Sustainable Environment

Authors

  • Margaret Olugbemisola Areo
  • Adebowale Biodun Areo

Abstract

A significant aspect of political propaganda/marketing often employed by political parties in Nigeria during electioneering campaigns is the printing and pasting of posters in the public built environment. Posters usage as a political party propaganda is a recent development in Nigerian politics. Its evolution is traceable to internal development brought about by emergence of democratic rule in Nigeria and external influence in the introduction of printing into the country. The study therefore examines the impact of propaganda tools such as posters, billboards, banners and flyers on Nigerian-built environment. It aims at identifying the aesthetic and the cost of re-beautification of the defaced environment during electioneering campaign. The study employed the use of qualitative means of gathering and analyzing data, through the use of visual aids. Findings revealed that though posters are cheaper and far reaching especially to advertise middle level politicians, the environments were made unsightly through the indiscriminate pasting of posters and other propaganda tools. It also revealed that the decisions of electorates are not influenced by the use of posters. The paper suggested the proper and decent use of propaganda tools in designated areas and concluded that the environment deserves better handling than what is obtainable currently. The paper therefore, recommends the enactment of environmental laws banning indiscriminate pasting of posters on roundabouts, immovable vehicles, signage, bridges and tarred roads.

DOI: 10.5901/ajis.2016.v5n2p9

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Published

2016-07-04

How to Cite

Areo, M. O., & Areo, A. B. (2016). Political Propaganda, Aesthetics and Sustainable Environment. Academic Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies, 5(2), 9. Retrieved from https://www.richtmann.org/journal/index.php/ajis/article/view/9260

Issue

Section

Research Articles