Digitalized Versus Interpreted Biology Instructions for Deaf Learners: Implications for a Technosociety

  • Olufemi T. Adigun Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, Faculty of Education, University of Zululand, South Africa
  • Dumisani R. Nzima Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, Faculty of Education, University of Zululand, South Africa

Abstract

Deaf learners have strived to enrol in science-related subjects but barriers towards effective teaching and learning have contributed to low performances in science-related subjects. Although previous studies have affirmed that learners’ attitude towards scientific instructions and pedagogical strategies used by science teachers creates barriers to effective learning and expected learning outcomes, but gaps still exist in the use of digital components in learning outcomes of deaf learners. Therefore, this study, determined the moderating effects of onset of deafness on the attitudes of deaf learners towards Biology in Ibadan, Nigeria. Twenty-seven deaf learners were exposed to an 8-week digitalized and interpreted Biology instructions. Data were collected using the Biology Achievement Test before and after the treatment sessions. The data generated were analysed using the Analysis of Variance at p < 0.05. The results revealed that deaf learners in the digital Biology class performed better than their peers in the interpreted Biology instructions. Variations in the attitude toward Biology based on onset of hearing loss were observed. Based on the findings, recommendations were made to adequately prepare the deaf for a technologically-driven inclusive society.

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Published
2020-09-23
How to Cite
Adigun, O. T., & Nzima, D. R. (2020). Digitalized Versus Interpreted Biology Instructions for Deaf Learners: Implications for a Technosociety. Journal of Educational and Social Research, 10(5), 265. https://doi.org/10.36941/jesr-2020-0104