Reality, Fiction and History in George Orwell’s novel 1984 and Kasëm Trebeshina’s Odin Mondvalsen

Authors

  • Marsela Turku Aleksander Moisiu University, Albania

Abstract

In the recent years one of the major contributions to the distinction between fiction and real world has been provided by the
theory and semantics of possible worlds, whose bases is the idea that reality is a universe composed of a plurality of distinct worlds. A
writer of fiction usually “draws” his material from the reality, from the models and the entities provided by the actual world, realistic
fiction, in particular, depends on “mimetic communication to create possible worlds. This paper deals with two novels that treat the same
topic (“the transformation of the society and of the human being under the communist dictatorship”) but with an enormous difference,
Orwell based his book almost entirely on his fictitious reality and imagination whereas Trebeshina has experienced the regime and its
reality. Many scholars and critics have tried to find similarities between Orwell’s and Trebeshina’s vision of reality and even in their life
experiences. This paper deals with the construction of fiction, reality, the role of history and the similarities and differences presented on
Trebeshina’s Odin Mondvalsen and Orwell’s 1984.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published

2011-09-01

How to Cite

Turku, M. . (2011). Reality, Fiction and History in George Orwell’s novel 1984 and Kasëm Trebeshina’s Odin Mondvalsen. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 2(3), 217. Retrieved from https://www.richtmann.org/journal/index.php/mjss/article/view/10837